Currency converters

During our investigation into the history of currency within New Zealand, we discovered a wide and sometimes interesting collection of coin and note submissions that interestingly didn’t make the official cut.

Ranging from famous rugby players, marlin, and a hammer and sickle. This feed our curiosity and we decided to create our own new banknotes.

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Levi: The notes aren’t made of paper as I thought. Can people rip them?

Amaya: The notes have pictures in the see-through part.

Amelia: Why are there different numbers on the notes? What do they mean?

Grayson: These famous people were put on the notes in 1992. They are all important people in our history.

We decided that we liked the different birds that were currently on the NZ notes but decided they needed a bit more colour so we all set about adding our own flair and personality into the notes we would make if we were in charge of creating the next round of banknotes. 

We decided that koru’s were a very common representation of New Zealand’s culture and that using warm and dark colours helped it stand out. 

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Beau: I used as many different but vibrant colours as I could to make my note stand out.

Amelia: I used a triangle type pattern in the background and coloured them green as it made me think of nature.

Tessa: I used a zigzag pattern and coloured it with dark colours making the bird look more radiant.

Maxwell: My background had dark and light colours making you look towards the bird's beak.

We not only made some amazing version on the New Zealand notes we also learnt about the history of our currency, the history of the people and birds on the current note’s. We were also able to explore how even with the same starting points everyone sees things differently, and they all turn out amazing.

Curriculum Links: Social Science, Numeracy, Finacial Literacy, Art, History

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